Nicotinamide prolongs survival of primary cultured hepatocytes without involving loss of hepatocyte-specific functions

C. Inoue, H. Yamamoto, T. Nakamura, A. Ichihara, H. Okamoto

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84 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When hepatocytes isolated from adult rats were cultured in the presence of 10 mM nicotinamide, insulin- and epidermal growth factor-induced DNA synthesis and cell proliferation were found to be greatly stimulated, and the cells were able to be kept alive for more than one month. In the nicotinamide-treated hepatocytes, albumin and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase mRNAs were present at much higher levels than in the untreated control, and the inducibility of tryptophan oxygenase gene expression by dexamethasone and glucagon was also preserved. Without nicotinamide, primary cultured hepatocytes were viable for only 5-7 days and the hepatocyte-specific phenotypes were rapidly lost. The intracellular NAD level was maintained in the nicotinamide-treated hepatocytes at or above the level in intact liver but depleted in hepatocytes without nicotinamide. These results suggest that the maintenance of the intracellular NAD level is essential for the growth and functioning of hepatocytes and that nicotinamide can preserve the NAD level by blocking NAD degradation as well as by acting as a precursor for NAD synthesis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4747-4750
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume264
Issue number9
Publication statusPublished - 1989

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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