Neural Basis of Impaired Cognitive Flexibility in Patients with Anorexia Nervosa

Yasuhiro Sato, Naohiro Saito, Atsushi Utsumi, Emiko Aizawa, Tomotaka Shoji, Masahiro Izumiyama, Hajime Mushiake, Michio Hongo, Shin Fukudo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background:Impaired cognitive flexibility in anorexia nervosa (AN) causes clinical problems and makes the disease hard to treat, but its neural basis has yet to be fully elucidated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the brain activity of individuals with AN while performing a task requiring cognitive flexibility on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), which is one of the most frequently used neurocognitive measures of cognitive flexibility and problem-solving ability.Methods:Participants were 15 female AN patients and 15 age- and intelligence quotient-matched healthy control women. Participants completed the WCST while their brain activity was measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging during the task. Brain activation in response to set shifting error feedback and the correlation between such brain activity and set shifting performance were analyzed.Results:The correct rate on the WCST was significantly poorer for AN patients than for controls. Patients showed poorer activity in the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex and bilateral parahippocampal cortex on set shifting than controls. Controls showed a positive correlation between correct rate and ventrolateral prefrontal activity in response to set shifting whereas patients did not.Conclusion:These findings suggest dysfunction of the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex and parahippocampal cortex as a cause of impaired cognitive flexibility in AN patients.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere61108
JournalPloS one
Volume8
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 May 10

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

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