Nationwide Survey of Stevens–Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis in Children in the United States

Yusuke Okubo, Kotaro Nochioka, Marcia A. Testa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are serious, life-threatening reactions to drug therapies, no efforts have been made to investigate the comprehensive change in epidemiology with respect to age, sex, and race and ethnicity in children. The risk of death was 0.3% to 1.5%, and the highest hospitalization rates were in children 15 to 19 years of age, boys, and black children. The highest proportions of hospitalizations were children with very low household income, those with private insurance, and those treated at large urban teaching hospitals in the West. A significant winter–autumn predominance was observed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)206-208
Number of pages3
JournalPediatric Dermatology
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Mar 1
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Dermatology

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