Nationwide real-world database of 20,462 patients enrolled in the Japanese Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (JAMIR): Impact of emergency coronary intervention in a super-aging population

JAMIR Investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Cardiovascular diseases, including acute myocardial infarction (AMI), are leading causes of death among the Japanese, who have the longest life expectancy in the world. Over the past 50 years in Japan, the percentage of elderly individuals has increased 4-fold, from 5.7% in 1960 to 23.1% in 2010. To explore medical practices and emergency care for AMI in this aging society, the Japan Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (JAMIR) was established as a nationwide real-world database. Methods: JAMIR conducted retrospective analysis of 20,462 AMI patients (mean age, 68.8 ± 13.3 years; 15,281 men [74.7%]) hospitalized between January 2011 and December 2013. Results: The rates of ambulance use and emergency PCI were 78.9% and 87.9%, respectively. The median door-to-balloon time was 80 min (interquartile range, 53–143 min). Overall in-hospital mortality was 8.3%, including 6.6% due to cardiac death. JAMIR included 4837 patients aged ≥80 years (23.6%). In this age group, patients who underwent PCI (79.9%) had significantly lower in-hospital mortality than those who did not (11.1% vs. 36.9%, P < 0.001). Conclusions: The large JAMIR database, with 24% of AMI patients aged ≥80 years, could provide useful information about medical care in an aging society. The reasonable in-hospital outcomes observed may justify consideration of PCI for patients with AMI aged ≥80 years.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalIJC Heart and Vasculature
Volume20
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Sep

Keywords

  • Acute myocardial infarction
  • Aging
  • Coronary intervention
  • Registry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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