Myristic acid, a side chain of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), can activate human polymorphonuclear leukocytes to produce oxygen radicals more potently than PMA

Mika Tada, Eiichiro Ichiishi, Rumiko Saito, Natsumi Emoto, Yoshimi Niwano, Masahiro Kohno

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Myristic acid (MyA), which is a saturated fatty acid (C14:0) and a side chain of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), was examined if MyA stimulates human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) to release oxygen radicals comparable to PMA by applying electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-spin-trapping method. When MyA was added to isolated human PMNs, spin adducts of 5,5-dimethyl-1- pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO)-OH and DMPO-OOH were time-dependently observed. The amounts of these spin adducts were larger than those of PMNs stimulated by PMA. These results clearly show that MyA is more potent agent to prime human PMNs than PMA, in a point of view of not only O2•- but also •OH production. This fact calls attention that too much intake of MyA that is known to be contained vegetable oils can lead to crippling effect through uncontrolled production of reactive oxygen species.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)309-314
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Biochemistry and Nutrition
Volume45
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Nov

Keywords

  • EPR spin-trapping
  • Myristic acid
  • Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate
  • Polymorphonuclear leukocyte
  • Superoxide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Clinical Biochemistry

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