Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in cancer patients at a tertiary care cancer center in Japan

Takahiro Fujita, Masahiro Endo, Yoshiaki Gu, Tomoaki Sato, Norio Ohmagari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The characteristics of active tuberculosis in cancer patients in Japan and the effects of this infection on cancer treatment have not yet been clarified. The records of all consecutive patients with microbiologically documented Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection diagnosed between September 2002 and March 2008 at Shizuoka cancer center (a 557-bed tertiary care cancer center in Japan) were reviewed. There were 24 cancer patients with active tuberculosis during the study period. Of these, 23 had solidorgan tumors, and the most common site of the underlying malignancy was the lung. Most of the patients had pulmonary tuberculosis. Among 15 patients followed up for more than 2 months prior to the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis, 12 had healed scars suggestive of old tuberculosis lesions, as shown by chest imaging obtained at the time of the initial evaluation. Discontinuation of cancer therapy or more than a month's delay in surgery occurred in 10 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Development of active tuberculosis can delay cancer treatment in Japanese centers. Cancer patients with scars suggestive of old tuberculosis disease lesions as shown by chest imaging should be screened for active tuberculosis and carefully followed up. In some cases, prophylactic treatment should be considered.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)213-216
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Infection and Chemotherapy
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Mar

Keywords

  • Anti-tumor agents
  • Cancer
  • Immunocompromised host
  • Tuberculosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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