Mutation analysis of copper-transporting P-type adenosine triphosphatase (ATP7B) in human solid carcinomas

Atsuko Kanzaki, Kentaro Nakayama, Hitoshi Miyashita, Shinobu Shirata, Yasutaka Nitta, Masahide Oubu, Masashi Higashimoto, Masato Mutoh, Shiro Mori, Soichi Konno, Kenji Ogawa, Masakazu Toi, Yuji Takebayashi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A major obstacle in the treatment of human solid carcinomas is the intrinsic/acquired resistance to cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Copper-transporting P-type adenosine triphosphatase (ATP7B) has been reported to be associated with cisplatin resistance in vitro. ATP7B is overexpressed in human solid carcinomas such as breast, gastric and oral squamous cell carcinomas. ATP7B expression has an influential effect on some subsets of patients with cisplatin-treated carcinomas. ATP7B mutation is well-known as a cause of Wilson's disease. In addition, the six copper-binding domain and ATP-binding domain of ATP7B are important for the transportation of metals. Therefore, we performed the mutation analysis at the six copper-binding domain and ATP-binding domain of ATP7B. No mutation at the six copper-binding domain and ATP-binding domain was observed in breast, gastric and oral squameous cell carcinomas. These results indicate that the analysis of the ATP7B gene and/or protein will be helpful for the choice of chemotherapy in patients with human solid carcinomas.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1913-1915
Number of pages3
JournalAnticancer research
Volume23
Issue number2 C
Publication statusPublished - 2003 Mar

Keywords

  • ATP7B
  • Cisplatin
  • Drug resistance
  • Solid carcinoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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