Moving a neodymium magnet promotes the migration of a magnetic tracer and increases the monitoring counts on the skin surface of sentinel lymph nodes in breast cancer

Masujiro Makita, Eriko Manabe, Tomoko Kurita, Hiroyuki Takei, Seigo Nakamura, Akihiro Kuwahata, Masaki Sekino, Moriaki Kusakabe, Yasuo Ohashi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: We suspected that moving a small neodymium magnet would promote migration of the magnetic tracer to the sentinel lymph node (SLN). Higher monitoring counts on the skin surface before making an incision help us detect SLNs easily and successfully. The present study evaluated the enhancement of the monitoring count on the skin surface in SLN detection based on the magnet movement in a sentinel lymph node biopsy (SNB) using superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles. Methods: After induction of general anesthesia, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were injected sub-dermally into the subareolar area or peritumorally. The neodymium magnet was moved over the skin from the injection site to the axilla to promote migration of the magnetic tracer without massage. A total of 62 patients were enrolled from February 2018 to November 2018: 13 cases were subjected to magnet movement 20 times (Group A), 8 were subjected to 1-min magnet movement (Group B), 26 were given a short (about 5 min) interval from injection to 1-min magnet movement (Group C), and 15 were given a long (about 25 min) interval before 1-min magnet movement using the magnetometer's head (Group D). In all cases, an SNB was conducted using both the radioisotope (RI) and SPIO methods. The monitoring counts on the skin surface were measured by a handheld magnetometer and compared among the four groups. Changes in the monitoring count by the interval and magnet movement were evaluated. Results: The identification rates of the SPIO and RI methods were 100 and 95.2%, respectively. The mean monitoring counts of Group A, B, C, and D were 2.39 μT, 2.73 μT, 3.15 μT, and 3.92 μT, respectively (p < 0.0001; Kruskal-Wallis test). The monitoring counts were higher with longer magnet movement and with the insertion of an interval. Although there were no relationships between the monitoring count on the skin surface and clinicopathologic factors, magnet movement strongly influenced the monitoring count on the skin surface. Conclusion: Moving a small neodymium magnet is effective for promoting migration of a magnetic tracer and increasing monitoring counts on the skin surface. Trial registration: UMIN, UMIN000029475. Registered 9 October 2017.

Original languageEnglish
Article number58
JournalBMC Medical Imaging
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 May 27
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Magnetometer
  • Neodymium magnet
  • Sentinel node biopsy
  • Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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