Movement of the proximal segment after intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy versus short lingual osteotomy with physiological positioning strategy

Seigo Ohba, Junya Tominaga, Takamitsu Koga, Kei ichiro Miura, Noriaki Yoshida, Izumi Asahina

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To clarify whether intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy (IVRO) or short lingual osteotomy (SLO) induces less proximal segmental movement after surgery without bone fixation. Methods: This study included patients who underwent IVRO or SLO without bone fixation. Cephalograms were taken before surgery (T1), immediately after surgery (T2), and >6 months after surgery (T3) to assess postoperative movement of the proximal segment and skeletal stability. The condylar angle was measured using computed tomography images taken at T1 and T3 to assess rotation. Results: Ninety patients were included (IVRO, n = 25; SLO, n = 65). The proximal segment swung laterally on the frontal cephalogram in the asymmetrical IVRO group at T3. The condylar head was rotated outwardly 6.52 ± 4.49° (p < 0.0001) in the symmetrical IVRO group and 8.06 ± 6.88° (p = 0.030) on the non-deviated side in the asymmetrical IVRO group at T3. The condyles were almost stable in the SLO group. Temporomandibular joint disorders were found in 2 of 22 IVRO patients and in 2 of 42 SLO patients with asymmetry at T3. Conclusion: This study suggests that SLO with the physiological positioning strategy (PPS) should be preferred over IVRO with the PPS whenever possible.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)638-644
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery
Volume48
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Jul
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Intraoral vertical rams osteotomy
  • Physiological positioning strategy (PPS)
  • Proximal segment
  • Short lingual osteotomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Oral Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology

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