Mouse myosin X: Molecular architecture and tissue expression as revealed by Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses

Satoshi Yonezawa, Atsushi Kimura, Seizo Koshiba, Shigeo Masaki, Takao Ono, Atsuko Hanai, Shinichi Sonta, Takashi Kageyama, Takayuki Takahashi, Akihiko Moriyama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The structure of the coding region of mouse myosin X cDNA was determined. The predicted protein sequence indicated an approximately 240 kDa molecular mass with 2062 amino acids. When aligned with the structure predicted for calf myosin X (GenBank Accession No. U55042), extremely highly conserved pleckstrin homology domains and a myosin tail homology 4 domain were apparent in the tail region, suggesting their importance for myosin X's function. Northern blot analysis revealed the existence of a myosin X mRNA, 8.7 kb in size, in various mouse tissues, while a similar size of human type myosin X mRNA was recognized mainly in the testis. In addition to the adult-type transcripts in mice, a smaller embryo-specific mRNA, 4.8 kb in size, was identified in early to late embryonic stages, suggesting the presence of a shorter myosin X isoform in mouse embryos. In situ hybridization experiments with mouse testis revealed that myosin X mRNA was restricted to Sertoli cells at stages VIII-X of the spermatogenesis cycle, suggesting that myosin X is implicated in the supporting cells during the spermatid morphogenesis. (C) 2000 Academic Press.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)526-533
Number of pages8
JournalBiochemical and biophysical research communications
Volume271
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000 May 10
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • MyTH4 domain
  • Myo10
  • Myosin X
  • PH domain
  • Sertoli cell
  • Talin-like domain
  • Testis
  • Unconventional myosin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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