Modification of rectal function and emotion by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in humans

Yuuichi Aizawa, Joe Morishita, Michiko Kano, Motoyori Kanazawa, Shin Fukudo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Gut microbiota may affect function of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). However, there have been a few studies on modification of brain-gut interactions with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to the DLPFC. We hypothesized that stimulation of the right or left DPFC by rTMS modifies the brain-gut interactions in humans. Subjects were 25 healthy males. Viscerosensory evoked potential (VEP) with sham (0 mA) or actual (30 mA) electrical stimulation (ES) of the rectum was taken after sham, low frequency rTMS at 0.1 Hz, and high frequency rTMS at 10 Hz to the right or left DLPFC. Rectal tone was measured with a rectal barostat. Visceral perception and emotion were analyzed using ordinates scale, rectal barostat, and viscerosensory evoked potential. Low frequency rTMS to the right DLPFC significantly reduced the visceral sensation and emotion composite score evoked by ES at 30 mA (p < 0.05). Plasma ACTH was significantly increased by high frequency rTMS to the right or left DLPFC (p < 0.05). Rectal fine contractions were significantly induced by low frequency rTMS to the right or left DLPFC and high frequency rTMS to the right DLPFC (p < 0.05). These results suggest that stimulation of the right or left DPFC by rTMS modifies the brain-gut interactions in humans.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)54-63
Number of pages10
JournalNeuroscience Research
Volume168
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Jul
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC)
  • Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)
  • Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS)
  • Visceral perception
  • Viscerosensory evoked potential (VEP)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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