Millennial- to centennial-scale interruptions of the Oceanic Anoxic Event 1b (Early Albian, mid-Cretaceous) inferred from benthic foraminiferal repopulation events

Oliver Friedrich, Hiroshi Nishi, Jörg Pross, Gerhard Schmiedl, Christoph Hemleben

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Early Albian Oceanic Anoxic Event 1b (OAE 1b) black shale is interrupted by one or more ventilation events that display significant changes in benthic and planktic populations. Within the OAE 1b sections studied, at ODP Site 1049, DSDP Site 545, and the Vocontian Basin, the benthic foraminiferal repopulation events last between ∼500 and ∼1,250 years and occur with a cyclicity of approximately 5.7 kyr. This period may represent an amplitude modulation of the precessional cycle. The OAE 1b sections from the marginal setting of the Vocontian Basin exhibit up to eight repopulation events. In contrast, there is only one repopulation event identified in the Atlantic OAE 1b sections from the Mazagan Plateau (DSDP 545) and Blake Nose (ODP 1049). Within the margin of dating uncertainties, this supraregional repopulation event occurred synchronously in the Vocontian Basin and the Atlantic Ocean. While the OAE 1b black shale formed under extremely warm and humid conditions, the repopulation events occurred during intervals of short-term cooling and reduced humidity at deepwater formation sites. The resulting increase in evaporation led to enhanced formation of low-latitude deep water, thus improving the ventilation of the sea floor.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)64-77
Number of pages14
JournalPalaios
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Feb 1
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Palaeontology

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