Microvesicles enhance the mobility of human diabetic adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells in vitro and improve wound healing in vivo

Nhu Thuy Trinh, Toshiharu Yamashita, Tran Cam Tu, Toshiki Kato, Kinuko Ohneda, Fujio Sato, Osamu Ohneda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Microvesicles (MVs) derived from mesenchymal stem cells showed the ability to alter the cell phenotype and function. We previously demonstrated that type 2 diabetic adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (dAT-MSCs) increase in cell aggregation and adhesion in vitro and impair wound healing in vivo. However, the characterization and function of MVs derived from human non-diabetic AT-MSCs (nAT-MSCs) remain unknown. In this study, we characterized nAT-MSC-derived MVs and their function after the transfection of dAT-MSCs with MVs using the scratch assay and a flap mouse model. We found that human nAT-MSC-derived MVs expressed MSC-surface markers and improved dAT-MSC functions by altering the expression of genes associated with cell migration, survival, inflammation, and angiogenesis as well as miR29c and miR150. Remarkably, the transfection of dAT-MSCs with nAT-MSC-derived MVs improved their migration ability in vitro and wound healing ability in a flap mouse model. These results demonstrate a promising opportunity to modify the function of dAT-MSCs for therapeutic stem cell application in diabetic patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1111-1118
Number of pages8
JournalBiochemical and biophysical research communications
Volume473
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 May 13
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Diabetes
  • Flap mouse model
  • Mesenchymal stem cells
  • Microvesicles
  • Wound healing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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