Mechanical properties and modeling of the stress-strain behavior of the urinary bladder in vivo

Masahito Saitoh, Katsumi Ohnishi, Tadahisa Matsuda, Hiroki Watanabe, A. Toshimitsu Yokobori, Takeo Yokobori, Fumiya Oki

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    A stretch test in vivo for living materials was newly developed and applied to the dog bladder. The stress-strain curve of the normal living bladder was a downward convex and rose very slowly. The curve showed hysteresis and speed-dependence. These results proved that the mechanical property of the urinary bladder was essentially viscoelastic. A computer analysis, based on the viscoelastic simulation model proposed by Glantz, was performed to evaluate the mechanical property of the bladder. Both proportional and exponential stiffness elevated in the extirpated bladder. In the denervated bladder, changes of the constants were not significant immediately after cutting the pelvic nerves; however, the proportional stiffness elevated remarkably two weeks after cutting. Compared with these abnormal bladders, the elastic constants of the normal living bladder were very low. The viscoelastic properties of the bladder and its low elastic constants seemed to account for the normal bladder function as a reservoir for urine.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationASTM Special Technical Publication
    PublisherPubl by ASTM
    Pages283-289
    Number of pages7
    Edition1173
    ISBN (Print)0803118945
    Publication statusPublished - 1994 Jan 1
    EventProceedings of the Symposium on Biomaterials' Mechanical Properties - Pittsburgh, PA, USA
    Duration: 1992 Sep 141992 Sep 18

    Publication series

    NameASTM Special Technical Publication
    Number1173
    ISSN (Print)0066-0558

    Other

    OtherProceedings of the Symposium on Biomaterials' Mechanical Properties
    CityPittsburgh, PA, USA
    Period92/9/1492/9/18

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Engineering(all)

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