Meat subtypes and colorectal cancer risk: A pooled analysis of 6 cohort studies in Japan

for the Research Group for the Development and Evaluation of Cancer Prevention Strategies in Japan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Red meat and processed meat have been suggested to increase risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), especially colon cancer. However, it remains unclear whether these associations differ according to meat subtypes or colon subsites. The present study addressed this issue by undertaking a pooled analysis of large population-based cohort studies in Japan: 5 studies comprising 232 403 participants (5694 CRC cases) for analysis based on frequency of meat intake, and 2 studies comprising 123 635 participants (3550 CRC cases) for analysis based on intake quantity. Study-specific hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using the Cox proportional hazards model and then pooled using the random effect model. Comparing the highest vs lowest quartile, beef intake was associated with an increased risk of colon cancer in women (pooled HR 1.20; 95% CI, 1.01-1.44) and distal colon cancer (DCC) risk in men (pooled HR 1.30; 95% CI, 1.05-1.61). Frequent intake of pork was associated with an increased risk of distal colon cancer in women (pooled HR 1.44; 95% CI, 1.10-1.87) for “3 times/wk or more” vs “less than 1 time/wk”. Frequent intake of processed red meat was associated with an increased risk of colon cancer in women (pooled HR 1.39; 95% CI, 0.97-2.00; P trend =.04) for “almost every day” vs “less than 1 time/wk”. No association was observed for chicken consumption. The present findings support that intake of beef, pork (women only), and processed red meat (women only) might be associated with a higher risk of colon (distal colon) cancer in Japanese.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3603-3614
Number of pages12
JournalCancer science
Volume110
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Nov 1

Keywords

  • colon cancer
  • pooled analysis
  • processed meat
  • rectal cancer
  • red meat subtype

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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