Measurement method for two-dimensional normal stress distribution of wheels on lateral loose soil slopes

Shoya Higa, Kenji Nagaoka, Keiji Nagatani, Kazuya Yoshida

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Surfaces of exploration targets for lunar/planetary robots (rovers), such as the Moon and Mars, are covered with fine sand. This sand makes the wheels of a rover susceptible to slip, and in the worst case, can lead to immobility. To avoid such situations, it is important to analyze the mechanics of the interaction between the soil and wheel. Hence, various devices to measure the normal stress distribution beneath wheels have been proposed. However, most of the conventional equipment is only able to measure the distribution in a flat soil environment. In practice, when a rover traverses sandy slopes, the normal stress distribution is not expected to have a simple shape like that for a flat environment. Therefore, we propose a measurement device for the two-dimensional normal stress distribution of a wheel on a lateral loose soil slope. Some experimental results prove the validity of the method.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2014 IEEE/SICE International Symposium on System Integration, SII 2014
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages603-608
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9781479969449
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 30
Event7th IEEE/SICE International Symposium on System Integration, SII 2014 - Tokyo, Japan
Duration: 2014 Dec 132014 Dec 15

Publication series

Name2014 IEEE/SICE International Symposium on System Integration, SII 2014

Other

Other7th IEEE/SICE International Symposium on System Integration, SII 2014
CountryJapan
CityTokyo
Period14/12/1314/12/15

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Information Systems

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