Maximum Occlusal force and incident functional disability in older adults: The Tsurugaya project

Takashi Ohi, T. Komiyama, Yoshitada Miyoshi, T. Murakami, A. Tsuboi, Y. Tomata, I. Tsuji, M. Watanabe, Y. Hattori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of the current study was to investigate the association between maximum occlusal force, which is an objective predictor of masticatory performance, and incident functional disability in an elderly Japanese population. A prospective cohort study was conducted targeting 815 (51.7% female) community-dwelling older adults aged ≥70 y residing in the Tsurugaya district, Sendai, Japan. The outcome measurement was incident functional disability, defined as a first certification of long-term care insurance in Japan, which is determined on the basis of a strictly established, uniform, nationwide standard. During a median follow-up of 7.9 y (interquartile range, 4.8-7.9 y), information on long-term care insurance was obtained from the Sendai Municipal Authority. Bilateral maximum occlusal forces of the participants were measured using a horseshoe-shaped pressure-indicating film, and the participants were categorized into quartiles based on occlusal force. Adjusted hazard ratios for functional disability were estimated with Cox proportional hazard models, adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, medical history, smoking status, alcohol consumption, duration of education, depressive symptoms, cognitive impairment, physical functioning, marital status, history of falls, and number of remaining teeth. The multiple-adjusted hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for incident functional disability compared to the greatest occlusal force quartile were 1.53 (95% CI, 1.02-2.33), 1.64 (95% CI, 1.06-2.55), and 1.64 (95% CI, 1.01-2.68) for the third, second, and first quartiles, respectively (P for trend = 0.011). A lower maximum occlusal force was significantly associated with an increased risk of functional disability independently of possible confounders, including the number of remaining teeth. Occlusal force may be a useful indicator of the relationship between oral function and geriatric health. Knowledge Transfer Statement: This prospective cohort study demonstrated that lower maximum occlusal force was associated with an increased risk of functional disability in older adults, even after adjustment for possible confounding factors, including the number of remaining teeth. This strengthens the rationale regarding the association between oral function and geriatric health. Particularly in older adults, occlusal force is reduced by several factors other than tooth loss, such as the absence of a dental prostheses, sarcopenia in the masticatory muscle, poor periodontal condition, and orofacial pain. Our findings suggest that maximum occlusal force may be a useful biomarker associated with diverse parameters aside from the number of remaining teeth.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)195-202
Number of pages8
JournalJDR Clinical and Translational Research
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Apr 1

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Bite force
  • Cohort study
  • Geriatric dentistry
  • Long-term care insurance
  • Mastication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Maximum Occlusal force and incident functional disability in older adults: The Tsurugaya project'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this