Low FOXA1 expression predicts good response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy resulting in good outcomes for luminal HER2-negative breast cancer cases

Y. Horimoto, A. Arakawa, N. Harada-Shoji, H. Sonoue, Y. Yoshida, T. Himuro, F. Igari, E. Tokuda, O. Mamat, M. Tanabe, O. Hino, M. Saito

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: FOXA1 expression is a good prognostic marker for endocrine therapy in hormone-positive breast cancer. We retrospectively examined breast cancer patients with luminal human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative tumours, as defined by immunohistochemistry, who received neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and investigated the relationship between treatment effects and FOXA1 expression. Methods: Biopsy specimens from 103 luminal HER2-negative tumours were immunohistochemically examined. FOXA1 effects on chemo-sensitivity were also investigated employing in vitro experiments. Results: FOXA1 and Ki67 expressions independently predicted a pathological complete response (pCR). Knockdown of FOXA1 by siRNA boosted the chemo-effect in oestrogen receptor-positive cells. The Cox hazards model revealed a pCR to be the strongest factor predicting a good patient outcome. Conclusions: Our present study showed low FOXA1 expression to be associated with a good response to NAC in luminal HER2-negative breast cancer. Improved outcomes of these patients suggest that NAC should be recommended to patients with low FOXA1 tumours.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)345-351
Number of pages7
JournalBritish Journal of Cancer
Volume112
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 20
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • FOXA1
  • Luminal breast cancer
  • Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy
  • Pathological complete response

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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