Low density lipoproteins develop resistance to oxidative modification due to inhibition of cholesteryl ester transfer protein by a monoclonal antibody

Masahiro Sugano, Shojiro Sawada, Keiko Tsuchida, Naoki Makino, Masafumi Kamada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although numerous studies have investigated the relationship between cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) remodeling, the relationship between CETP and low density lipoproteins (LDL) is still not fully understood. In the present study, we examined the effect of the inhibition of CETP on both LDL oxidation and the uptake of the oxidized LDL, which were made from LDL under condition of CETP inhibition, by macrophages using a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to CETP in incubated plasma. The 6-h incubation of plasma derived from healthy, fasting human subjects led to the transfer of cholesteryl ester (CE) from HDL to VLDL and LDL, and of triglycerides (TG) from VLDL to HDL and LDL. These net mass transfers of neutral lipids among the lipoproteins were eliminated by the mAb. The incubation of plasma either with or without the mAb did not affect the phospholipid compositions in any lipoproteins. As a result, the LDL fractionated from the plasma incubated with the mAb contained significantly less CE and TG in comparison to the LDL fractionated from the plasma incubated without the mAb. The percentage of fatty acid composition of LDL did not differ among the unincubated plasma, the plasma incubated with the mAb, and that incubated without the mAb. When LDL were oxidized with CuSO4, the LDL fractionated from the plasma incubated with the mAb were significantly resistant to the oxidative modification determined by measuring the amount of TBARS and by continuously monitoring the formation of the conjugated dienes, in comparison to the LDL fractionated from the plasma incubated without the mAb. The accumulation of cholesteryl ester of oxidized LDL, which had been oxidized for 2 h with CuSO4, in J774.1 cells also decreased significantly in the LDL fractionated from the plasma incubated with mAb in comparison to the LDL fractionated from the plasma incubated without the mAb. These results indicate that CETP inhibition reduces the composition of CE and TG in LDL and makes the LDL resistant to oxidation. In addition, the uptake of the oxidized LDL, which was made from the LDL under condition of CETP inhibition, by macrophages also decreased.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)126-133
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of lipid research
Volume41
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2000 Jan
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cholesteryl ester
  • Cholesteryl ester transfer protein
  • Fatty acids
  • LDL oxidation
  • Triglycerides

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology
  • Cell Biology

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