Loss of down syndrome critical region-1 leads to cholesterol metabolic dysfunction that exaggerates hypercholesterolemia in ApoE-null background

Masashi Muramatsu, Tsuyoshi Osawa, Yuri Miyamura, Suguru Nakagawa, Toshiya Tanaka, Tatsuhiko Kodama, Hiroyuki Aburatani, Juro Sakai, Sandra Ryeom, Takashi Minami

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Down syndrome critical region (DSCR)-1 functions as a feedback modulator for calcineurin-nuclear factor for activated T cell (NFAT) signals, which are crucial for cell proliferation and inflammation. Stable expression of DSCR-1 inhibits pathological angiogenesis and septic inflammation. DSCR-1 also plays a critical role in vascular wall remodeling associated with aneurysm development that occurs primarily in smooth muscle cells. Besides, Dscr-1 deficiency promotes the M1-to M2-like phenotypic switch in macrophages, which correlates to the reduction of denatured cholesterol uptakes. However, the distinct roles of DSCR-1 in cholesterol and lipid metabolism are not well understood. Here, we show that loss of apolipoprotein (Apo) E in mice with chronic hypercholesterolemia induced Dscr-1 expression in the liver and aortic atheroma. In Dscr-1-null mice fed a high-fat diet, oxidative- and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was induced, and sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) 2 production in hepatocytes was stimulated. This exaggerated ApoE-/-mediated nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and subsequent hypercholesterolemia. Genome-wide screening revealed that loss of both ApoE and Dscr-1 resulted in the induction of immune- and leukocyte activation-related genes in the liver compared with ApoE deficiency alone. However, expressions of inflammation-activated markers and levels of monocyte adhesion were suspended upon induction of the Dscr-1 null background in the aortic endothelium. Collectively, our study shows that the combined loss of Dscr-1 and ApoE causes metabolic dysfunction in the liver but reduces atherosclerotic plaques, thereby leading to a dramatic increase in serum cholesterol and the formation of sporadic vasculopathy.

Original languageEnglish
Article number100697
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume296
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Jan 1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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