Long acellular nerve transplants for allogeneic grafting and the effects of basic fibroblast growth factor on the growth of regenerating axons in dogs: A preliminary report

C. Ide, K. Tohyama, K. Tajima, K. Endoh, K. Sano, M. Tamura, A. Mizoguchi, M. Kitada, T. Morihara, M. Shirasu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sciatic nerves were excised from 3 beagle dogs about 5 h after their sacrifice, treated three times by freezing and thawing, and stored in physiological saline for 3 months at -20°C until used. Nerve segments 5 cm in length prepared from these stored nerves were transplanted to the common peroneal nerve in the right hindlimb of beagle dogs. Sixteen beagle dogs in total were used, in four treatment groups of two pairs each studied at 1 and 3 months. Five-hundred microliters basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) of two different concentrations (10 μg/300 μl and 100 μg/300 μl) which were impregnated in 0.5 ml gelatin hydrogels was applied around the sutured allografts. Autografting was also done in 4 beagle dogs, with no bFGF application. One month after the grafting, no regenerating nerves extended beyond the middle of the transplant in any of the allografts, except in the autografts in which a number of regenerated (myelinated) axons were present. Three months after the grafting, an abundance of myelinated axons was found at the middle of the graft: the numbers of axons per 104 μm2 were 22.6 in the autografts and 10.6, 10.4 and 19.2 in the allografts treated with no bFGF, low-dose bFGF, and high-dose bFGF, respectively. Regenerating axons extended into the host nerve: the numbers of myelinated axons at the level 1.5 cm distal to the distal suture were 35.7, 0.9, 3.8, and 12.1 per 104 μm2 in the above respective order. Although it was inferior in quality to the autograft, peripheral nerve regeneration was extensive in the distal nerve using freeze-thawed and bFGF-treated allografts at 3 months. Electromyography showed that the peroneus longus muscle responded to the electrical stimuli given at the site proximal to the transplant in all four groups. These data indicate that a 5-cm acellular nerve segment containing Schwann cell basal laminae can be used successfully as an allograft without any immunosuppressants and that exogenously applied bFGF can improve nerve regeneration by enhancing the growth of regenerating axons.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)99-112
Number of pages14
JournalExperimental Neurology
Volume154
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1998 Nov

Keywords

  • Acellular allograft
  • Dog
  • Long nerve graft
  • Peripheral nerve regeneration
  • Schwann cell basal lamina
  • bFGF

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Developmental Neuroscience

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Long acellular nerve transplants for allogeneic grafting and the effects of basic fibroblast growth factor on the growth of regenerating axons in dogs: A preliminary report'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this