Localization of double, roentgenographically occult lung cancer: Cytologic findings from selective brushing of all segmental and subsegmental bronchi

M. Sagawa, Y. Saito, M. Sato, K. Usuda, C. Endo, S. Takahashi, K. Kanma, N. Nagamoto, S. Fujimura, S. I. Ohta, T. Imai, H. Suda, H. Sato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using selective brushing of all segmental and subsegmental bronchi, six patients were diagnosed as having synchronous, double, roentgenographically occult lung cancers. Experienced bronchoscopists failed to detect four 'second cancer' lesions in six patients. The appearance of atypical cells as shown by cytologic examination indicated the probability of the presence of cancer in the examined bronchus. Single cancer cells or tiny clusters of cells with orangeophilic cytoplasm can appear in specimens obtained from all bronchi, and such cells should not be considered to have originated in the bronchi under examination. Medium-sized or large clusters of cancer cells without degeneration and with basophilic cytoplasm appear only in specimens obtained from bronchi in which a cancer lesion exists, and thus they should be considered to have originated in the bronchi under examination. Cancer cells with orangeophilic cytoplasm in clusters should be considered to have originated in unknown locations. To determine the origin of such cells, one must compare the specimens with those obtained from other segmental and subsegmental bronchi. Our findings suggest that selective brushing of all segmental and subsegmental bronchi is a useful method of detecting unrecognizable second cancers and that the method should be employed for all patients with positive sputum cytology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)392-397
Number of pages6
JournalActa Cytologica
Volume38
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1994 Jan 1

Keywords

  • bronchi
  • lung neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Histology

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