LIS1-dependent retrograde translocation of excitatory synapses in developing interneuron dendrites

Izumi Kawabata, Yutaro Kashiwagi, Kazuki Obashi, Masamichi Ohkura, Junichi Nakai, Anthony Wynshaw-Boris, Yuchio Yanagawa, Shigeo Okabe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Synaptic remodelling coordinated with dendritic growth is essential for proper development of neural connections. After establishment of synaptic contacts, synaptic junctions are thought to become stationary and provide fixed anchoring points for further dendritic growth. However, the possibility of active translocation of synapses along dendritic protrusions, to guide the proper arrangement of synaptic distribution, has not yet been fully investigated. Here we show that immature dendrites of 3-aminobutyric acid-positive interneurons form long protrusions and that these protrusions serve as conduits for retrograde translocation of synaptic contacts to the parental dendrites. This translocation process is dependent on microtubules and the activity of LIS1, an essential regulator of dynein-mediated motility. Suppression of this retrograde translocation results in disorganized synaptic patterns on interneuron dendrites. Taken together, these findings suggest the existence of an active microtubule-dependent mechanism for synaptic translocation that helps in the establishment of proper synaptic distribution on dendrites.

Original languageEnglish
Article number722
JournalNature communications
Volume3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

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    Kawabata, I., Kashiwagi, Y., Obashi, K., Ohkura, M., Nakai, J., Wynshaw-Boris, A., Yanagawa, Y., & Okabe, S. (2012). LIS1-dependent retrograde translocation of excitatory synapses in developing interneuron dendrites. Nature communications, 3, [722]. https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms1736