Lectins induce resistance to proteases and/or mechanical stimulus in all examined cells - Including bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells - On various scaffolds

Haruki Nishimura, Masahiro Nishimura, Ryo Oda, Katsuyuki Yamanaka, Takehiro Matsubara, Yoshie Ozaki, Kensuke Sekiya, Taizo Hamada, Yukio Kato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), chondrocytes, osteoblasts, or muscle cells promotes regeneration. However, these cells adhere poorly to some scaffolds - depending upon the scaffold material - and are often damaged by proteases or mechanical stimuli at site of transplantation. We found, however, that MSC, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts - along with some other cells - that were exposed to phaseolus vulgaris erythroagglutinin (PHA-E) or concanavalin A (ConA) increased their adhesion capacity on plastic tissue culture dishes and on plates of hydroxyapatite, titanium and poly-DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA), and that these cells, moreover, built up resistance to proteases and/or mechanical stimuli. Thus, lectins may have great potential in tissue engineering and cell therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)119-127
Number of pages9
JournalExperimental Cell Research
Volume295
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004 Apr 15

Keywords

  • Cell adhesion
  • Cell attachment
  • Concanavalin A
  • Mesenchymal stem cells
  • Phaseolus vulgaris erythroagglutinin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

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