Kinetochore-dependent microtubule rescue ensures their efficient and sustained interactions in early mitosis

Sapan R. Gandhi, Marek Gierliński, Akihisa Mino, Kozo Tanaka, Etsushi Kitamura, Lesley Clayton, Tomoyuki U. Tanaka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

How kinetochores regulate microtubule dynamics to ensure proper kinetochore-microtubule interactions is unknown. Here, we studied this during early mitosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. When a microtubule shrinks and its plus end reaches a kinetochore bound to its lateral surface, the microtubule end attempts to tether the kinetochore. This process often fails and, responding to this failure, microtubule rescue (conversion from shrinkage to growth) occurs, preventing kinetochore detachment from the microtubule end. This rescue is promoted by Stu2 transfer (ortholog of vertebrate XMAP215/ch-TOG) from the kinetochore to the microtubule end. Meanwhile, microtubule rescue distal to the kinetochore is also promoted by Stu2, which is transported by a kinesin-8 motor Kip3 along the microtubule from the kinetochore. Microtubule extension following rescue facilitates interaction with other widely scattered kinetochores, diminishing long delays in collecting the complete set of kinetochores by microtubules. Thus, kinetochore-dependent microtubule rescue ensures efficient and sustained kinetochore-microtubule interactions in early mitosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)920-933
Number of pages14
JournalDevelopmental cell
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Nov 15

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

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