Joint impact of health risks on health care charges: 7-Year follow-up of National Health Insurance beneficiaries in Japan (the Ohsaki Study)

Shinichi Kuriyama, Atsushi Hozawa, Kaori Ohmori, Yoshinori Suzuki, Yoshikazu Nishino, Kazuki Fujita, Yoshitaka Tsubono, Ichiro Tsuji

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. The objective of this study was to examine the joint impact of modifiable health-risk factors such as smoking, obesity, and physical inactivity on direct health care charges. Method. We conducted a population-based prospective cohort study, with follow-up from 1995 to 2001. The participants were Japanese National Health Insurance (NHI) beneficiaries (26,110 men and women aged 40-79 years). Results. 'No risk' group defined as never-smoking, body mass index (BMI) 20.0-24.9 kg/m2, and walking for ≥1 h/day had mean health care charges of $171.6 after adjustment for potential confounders. Compared with this group, the presence of smoking (SM; ever-smoking) alone, obesity alone (OB; BMI ≥25.0 kg/m2), or physical inactivity (PI; walking for <1 h/day) alone were associated with a 8.3%, 7.1%, or 8.0% increase in health care charges, respectively. The combinations of the risks of SM and OB, SM and PI, OB and PI, and SM and OB and PI were associated with a 11.7%, 31.4%, 16.4%, and 42.6% increase in charges, respectively. Conclusion. Interventions to improve modifiable health-risk factors may be a cost-effective approach for reducing health care charges as well as improving people's health.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1194-1199
Number of pages6
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume39
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004 Dec

Keywords

  • Cohort studies
  • Health care charges
  • Japan
  • Joint exposure
  • Obesity
  • Physical inactivity
  • Smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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