Iron attenuates erythropoietin production by decreasing hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 2α concentrations in renal interstitial fibroblasts

Norio Suzuki, Yukari Matsuo-Tezuka, Yusuke Sasaki, Koji Sato, Kenichiro Miyauchi, Koichiro Kato, Sakae Saito, Yasushi Shimonaka, Michinori Hirata, Masayuki Yamamoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Iron is an essential mineral for oxygen delivery and for a variety of enzymatic activities, but excessive iron results in oxidative cytotoxicity. Because iron is primarily used in red blood cells, defective erythropoiesis caused by loss of the erythroid growth factor erythropoietin (Epo) elevates iron storage levels in serum and tissues. Here, we investigated the effects of iron in a mouse model of Epo-deficiency anemia, in which serum iron concentration was significantly elevated. We found that intraperitoneal injection of iron-dextran caused severe iron deposition in renal interstitial fibroblasts, the site of Epo production. Iron overload induced by either intraperitoneal injection or feeding decreased activity of endogenous Epo gene expression by reducing levels of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 2α (HIF2α), the major transcriptional activator of the Epo gene. Administration of an iron-deficient diet to the anemic mice reduced serum iron to normal concentration and enhanced the ability of renal Epo production. These results demonstrate that iron overload due to Epo deficiency attenuates endogenous Epo gene expression in the kidneys. Thus, iron suppresses Epo production by reducing HIF2α concentration in renal interstitial fibroblasts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)900-911
Number of pages12
JournalKidney international
Volume94
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Nov

Keywords

  • HIF2α
  • erythropoietin
  • iron
  • mouse model
  • renal anemia
  • renal interstitium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

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