Intrauterine ischemic reperfusion switches the fetal transcriptional pattern from HIF-1α- to p53-dependent regulation in the murine brain

Yupeng Dong, Takuya Ito, Clarissa Velayo, Takafumi Sato, Keita Iida, Miyuki Endo, Kiyoe Funamoto, Naoaki Sato, Nobuo Yaegashi, Yoshitaka Kimura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ischemic reperfusion (IR) during the perinatal period is a known causative factor of fetal brain damage. So far, both morphologic and histologic evidence has shown that fetal brain damage can be observed only several hours to days after an IR insult has occurred. Therefore, to prevent fetal brain damage under these circumstances, a more detailed understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms involved during an acute response to IR is necessary. In the present work, pregnant mice were exposed to IR on day 18 of gestation by clipping one side of the maternal uterine horn. Simultaneous fetal electrocardiography was performed during the procedure to verify that conditions resulting in fetal brain damage were met. Fetal brain sampling within 30 minutes after IR insult revealed molecular evidence that a fetal response was indeed triggered in the form of inhibition of the Akt-mTOR-S6 synthesis pathway. Interestingly, significant changes in mRNA levels for both HIF-1α and p53 were apparent and gene regulation patterns were observed to switch from a HIF-1α-dependent to a p53-dependent process. Moreover, pre-treatment with pifithrin-α, a p53 inhibitor, inhibited protein synthesis almost completely, revealing the possibility of preventing fetal brain damage by prophylactic pifithrin-α treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere110577
JournalPloS one
Volume9
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Oct 17

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

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