Intraoperative infrared brain surface blood flow monitoring during superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery anastomosis in patients with childhood moyamoya disease

Atsuhiro Nakagawa, Miki Fujimura, Tatsuhiko Arafune, Ichiro Sakuma, Teiji Tominaga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To monitor patency of the bypass and to accomplish comprehensive visualized evaluation of brain surface hemodynamics in childhood moyamoya patients, we performed intraoperative monitoring using novel infrared imaging system. Materials and methods: Intraoperative monitoring of brain surface blood flow by IRIS V infrared imaging system has been conducted during superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery anastomosis on seven sides of five pediatric patients with moyamoya disease (man/woman=2:3, 7-8 years old). The range of recipient artery was 0.7-0.8 mm (average 0.75 mm). Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography were performed routinely before and after surgery. Conclusions: In all cases, patency of bypass, as well as detailed local hemodynamics and changes of brain surface temperature distribution could be evaluated. Intraoperative infrared system will be a feasible monitoring not only for noninvasive intraoperative evaluation of bypass patency but also for local hemodynamics even in patients with childhood moyamoya disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1299-1305
Number of pages7
JournalChild's Nervous System
Volume24
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Keywords

  • Bypass patency
  • EC-IC bypass
  • Hemodynamics
  • Hyperperfusion
  • Intraoperative monitoring
  • Minimally invasive neurosurgery
  • Neurocritical care
  • Thermal artery imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Clinical Neurology

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