Intraduodenal and intrajejunal administration of the herbal medicine, dai-kenchu-tou, stimulates small intestinal motility via cholinergic receptors in conscious dogs

X. L. Jin, Chikashi Shibata, H. Naito, T. Ueno, Y. Funayama, K. Fukushima, S. Matsuno, Iwao Sasaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to study the effect and mechanism of action of intraduodenal and intrajejunal dai-kenchu-to, an herbal medicine clinically effective for uncomplicated postoperative adhesive intestinal obstruction, on upper gastrointestinal motility. Five mongrel dogs were equipped with four strain-gauge force transducers on the antrum, duodenum, and proximal and distal jejunum to measure contractile activity. Dai-kenchu-to (0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 g) was administered into the duodenal or proximal jejunal lumen. The effect of atropine, hexamethonium, phentolamine, propranolol, and ondansetron on intraduodenal and intrajejunal dai-kenchu-to-induced contractions was studied. Plasma motilin was measured by specific radioimmunoassay. Intraduodenal and intrajejunal dai-kenchu-to induced phasic contractions in the duodenum and proximal jejunum, respectively, and those contractions migrated distally. Phasic contractions induced by intraduodenal and intrajejunal dai-kenchu-to were inhibited by atropine and hexamethonium at all sites. Plasma motilin was not affected by dai-kenchu-to. Intraduodenal and intrajejunal dai-kenchu-to stimulates upper gastrointestinal motility at and distal to the administration sites through cholinergic receptors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1171-1176
Number of pages6
JournalDigestive Diseases and Sciences
Volume46
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001 Jun 21

Keywords

  • 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptors
  • Cholinergic receptors
  • Herbal medicine
  • Intestinal obstruction
  • Motilin
  • Motility
  • Strain-gauge force transducer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Gastroenterology

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