Intra-abdominal infectious complications following gastrectomy in patients with excessive visceral fat

Norihiko Sugisawa, Masanori Tokunaga, Yutaka Tanizawa, Etsuro Bando, Taiichi Kawamura, Masanori Terashima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background Excessive visceral fat may be a better predictor of the development of postoperative morbidity after gastrectomy than body mass index (BMI). The aim of the present study was to clarify the most appropriate fat parameter to predict pancreas-related infection and anastomotic leakage following gastrectomy. Methods The study was performed in 206 patients who underwent curative gastrectomy at the Shizuoka Cancer Center between April 2008 and March 2009. Relationships between fat parameters, including visceral fat area (VFA), and early surgical outcomes were investigated. The risk factors for pancreas-related infection and anastomotic leakage were identified using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results There was no strong association between any of the fat parameters and operating time, intraoperative blood loss, the number of lymph nodes retrieved, or the duration of the postoperative hospital stay. Pancreas-related infection occurred in 18 patients (8.7%), whereas anastomotic leakage was observed in 10 patients (4.9%). Of all the fat parameters, only VFA was found to be an independent risk factor for both pancreas-related infection and anastomotic leakage, with odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of 1.015 (1.005-1.025) and 1.010 (1.000-1.021), respectively. Conclusions Excessive visceral fat, represented by the VFA, was found to be an independent risk factor for both pancreas-related infection and anastomotic leakage following gastrectomy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)206-212
Number of pages7
JournalGastric Cancer
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Apr
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Gastrectomy
  • Gastric cancer
  • Postoperative complication
  • Visceral fat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Gastroenterology
  • Cancer Research

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