Interference from irrelevant features on visual discrimination by macaques (Macaca fuscata): A behavioral analogue of the human stroop effect

Johan Lauwereyns, Masashi Koizumi, Masamichi Sakagami, Okihide Hikosaka, Shunsuke Kobayashi, Ken Ichiro Tsutsui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To study the operation of selective attention in a conflict situation with automatic processes, we trained 4 Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) extensively on a manual go/no-go task. The monkey had to discriminate either the color, shape, motion direction, or location of a visual stimulus. In each trial, the behavioral meaning of the relevant feature (go or no-go) could either be congruent or incongruent with irrelevant features of the same stimulus. Reaction times were slowed, and error rates increased when irrelevant stimulus features were incongruent with the required response. The effects were obtained when the monkey attended to the color, shape, or motion direction, but not when it attended to the location of the stimulus. The effects were cumulative so that the interference from 1 incongruent feature was smaller than that from 2 incongruent features. We propose that the present paradigm provides a behavioral analogue of the human Stroop effect.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)352-357
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000 Jul

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

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