Interannual variations in the Hawaiian Lee Countercurrent

Hiroto Abe, Kimio Hanawa, Naoto Ebuchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Hawaiian Lee Countercurrent (HLCC) is an eastward surface current flowing against the broad westward flow of the North Pacific subtropical circulation. Analyses of satellite altimeter data over 16 years revealed that the HLCC is characterized by strong interannual variations. The strength and meridional location of the HLCC axis varied significantly year by year. The eastward velocity of the HLCC was higher when the location of the axis was stable. Mechanisms for the interannual variations were explored by analyses of the altimeter data and results from a simple baroclinic model. The interannual variations in the strength of the HLCC did not correlate with those of the wind stress curl (WSC) dipole formed on the leeward side of the Hawaii Islands, although the WSC dipole has been recognized as the generation mechanism of the HLCC. Meridional gradients of the sea surface height anomaly (SSHA) across the HLCC generated by baroclinic Rossby waves propagating westward from the east of the Hawaii Islands were suggested as a possible mechanism for the interannual variations in the HLCC. The spatial patterns in the observed SSHAs were reproduced by a linear baroclinic Rossby wave model forced by wind fields from a numerical weather prediction model. Further analysis of the wind data suggested that positive and negative anomalies of WSC associated with changes in the trade winds in the area east of the Hawaii Islands are a major forcing for generating SSHAs that lead to the HLCC variations with a time lag of about 1 year.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)191-202
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Oceanography
Volume69
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Jan 11

Keywords

  • Baroclinic Rossby wave
  • Hawaiian Lee Countercurrent
  • Interannual variation
  • Reduced gravity model
  • Satellite altimeter
  • Trade winds
  • Wind stress curl

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oceanography

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