Interactions between thermal cycled resilient denture lining materials, salivary and serum pellicles and Candida albicans in vitro. Part I. Effects on fungal growth

H. Nikawa, C. Jin, T. Hamada, H. Murata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the present study, the growth of a single isolate of Candida albicans on seven saliva-, serum-coated or protein free (uncoated), thermocycled (4-70°C for 1 min, respectively; 0, 1000 and 10 000 times) commercial resilient lining materials was investigated by monitoring pH changes in growth media. The inhibitory effect of the tissue conditioners on fungal growth was observed using three parameters, i.e. (i) the delay in the onset of the rapid decline in pH, (ii) the reduction in the rate of pH change and (iii) the pH minima reached. In the case of control soft liners (not thermocycled and uncoated), the antifungal effect appeared to depend upon the type of commercial soft liner used. Thus, an initial delay in pH decline and a very high pH minima were observed with fluoric and heat-cured silicone materials. High pH minima were also observed with cold-cured acrylic soft liners, whereas cold-cured silicone materials did not significantly differ from heat-cured acrylic resin (P > 0.05), However, the antifungal effect of the materials was significantly reduced both by thermal cycling (ANOVA, P < 0.01) and a layer of protein coating (saliva, P < 0.05; serum, P < 0.01). These results, taken together, suggest that the ageing of the materials and the biological fluids of the host, particularly serum, promote yeast growth on soft lining materials.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41-51
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of oral rehabilitation
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000 Jan

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

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