Inhibition of Nicotine Dependence by Curcuminoid Is Associated with Reduced Acetylcholinesterase Activity in the Mouse Brain

Gofarana Wilar, Kusnandar Anggadiredja, Yasuharu Shinoda, Kohji Fukunaga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nicotine is a stimulatory component in tobacco that activates the central nervous system reward pathway and causes nicotine dependence. We found that the anti-inflammatory agent, curcuminoid, prevents nicotine dependence and relapse, as assessed by the conditioned placed preference test. Curcuminoid (1, 3.2, and 10 mg·kg-1, oral) dose-dependently inhibited nicotine dependence and enhanced nicotine extinction when administrated 30 min prior to nicotine administration (0.5 mg·kg-1, i.p.) for 7 days. In addition, curcuminoid significantly suppressed the priming effects of nicotine and inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. Taken together, curcuminoid ameliorates nicotine dependence and relapse, in part via the inhibition of the AChE activity in the brain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)223-232
Number of pages10
JournalPharmacology
Volume102
Issue number3-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Sep 1

Keywords

  • Cholinergic pathway
  • Conditioned placed preference
  • Curcuminoid
  • Nicotine dependence
  • Reward

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

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