Influence of sound specificity and familiarity on Japanese macaques' (Macaca fuscata) auditory laterality

Alban Lemasson, Hiroki Koda, Akemi Kato, Chisako Oyakawa, Catherine Blois-Heulin, Nobuo Masataka

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    14 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Despite attempts to generalise the left hemisphere-speech association of humans to animal communication, the debate remains open. More studies on primates are needed to explore the potential effects of sound specificity and familiarity. Familiar and non-familiar nonhuman primate contact calls, bird calls and non-biological sounds were broadcast to Japanese macaques. Macaques turned their heads preferentially towards the left (right hemisphere) when hearing conspecific or familiar primates supporting hemispheric specialisation. Our results support the role of experience in brain organisation and the importance of social factors to understand laterality evolution.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)286-289
    Number of pages4
    JournalBehavioural Brain Research
    Volume208
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010 Mar 17

    Keywords

    • Auditory processing
    • Familiarity
    • Head-turn paradigm
    • Hemispheric specialisation
    • Macaque
    • Specificity

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Behavioral Neuroscience

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