Infectivity of Cryptosporidium andersoni and Cryptosporidium muris to normal and immunosuppressive cynomolgus monkeys

Koichi Masuno, Yasuhiro Fukuda, Masahito Kubo, Ryo Ikarashi, Takeshi Kuraishi, Shosaku Hattori, Junpei Kimura, Chieko Kai, Tokuma Yanai, Yutaka Nakai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cryptosporidium andersoni and Cryptosporidium muris infections have been found in the mice and/or cattle. The oocysts of C. andersoni and C. muris have been sporadically detected in human feces, but the infectious capacity and features have been unknown, because of the scarcity of reports involving human infections. To assess the infectivity and the clinical and pathological features of C. andersoni and C. muris in primates, an experimental infectious study was conducted using cynomolgus monkeys. The monkeys were orally inoculated with oocysts of two different C. andersoni Kawatabi types and C. muris RN-66 under normal and immunosuppressive conditions. The feces of the monkeys were monitored for about 40 days after the administration of oocysts using the flotation method, but no shedding oocysts were observed under either both normal or immunosuppressive conditions. Gross and histopathological examinations were performed on the immunosuppressive monkeys, but these revealed no evidence of Cryptosporidium infections, even though the monkeys were subjected to immunosuppressive conditions. It is hypothesized that C. andersoni and C. muris pose little danger of infection in primates even under immunosuppressive conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)169-172
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Veterinary Medical Science
Volume76
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Feb

Keywords

  • Cryptosporidium
  • Experimental animals
  • Monkey
  • Parasitology
  • Pathology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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