Individual Variability in Simultaneous Contrast for Color and Brightness: Small Sample Factor Analyses Reveal Separate Induction Processes for Short and Long Flashes

Sae Kaneko, Ikuya Murakami, Ichiro Kuriki, David H. Peterzell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In classic simultaneous color contrast and simultaneous brightness contrast, the color or brightness of a stimulus appears to shift toward the complementary (opposite) color or brightness of its surrounding region. Kaneko and colleagues proposed that simultaneous contrast involves separate “fast” and “slow” mechanisms, with stronger induction effects for fast than slow. Support for the model came from a diverse series of experiments showing that induction by surrounds varying in luminance or color was stronger for brief than long presentation times (10–40 vs. 80–640 ms). Here, to further examine possible underlying processes, we reanalyzed 12 separate small data sets from these studies using correlational and factor analytic techniques. For each analysis, a principal component analysis of induction strength revealed two factors, with one Varimax-rotated factor accounting for brief and one for long durations. In simultaneous brightness experiments, separate factor pairs were obtained for luminance increments and decrements. Despite being based on small sample sizes, the two-factor consistency among 12 analyses would not be expected by chance. The results are consistent with separate fast and slow processes mediating simultaneous contrast for brief and long flashes.

Original languageEnglish
Journali-Perception
Volume9
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Sep 1

Keywords

  • brightness
  • chromatic induction
  • color
  • color appearance
  • individual differences
  • lightness
  • simultaneous contrast

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Artificial Intelligence

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