Increased methamphetamine-induced locomotor activity and behavioral sensitization in histamine-deficient mice

Yasuhiko Kubota, Chihiro Ito, Eiichi Sakurai, Eiko Sakurai, Takehiko Watanabe, Hiroshi Ohtsu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have recently suggested that the brain histamine has an inhibitory role on the behavioral effects of methamphetamine by pharmacological studies. In this study, we used the histidine decarboxylase gene knockout mice and measured the spontaneous locomotor activity, the changes of locomotion by single and repeated administrations of methamphetamine, and the contents of brain monoamines and amino acids at 1 h after a single administration of methamphetamine. In the histidine decarboxylase gene knockout mice, spontaneous locomotor activity during the dark period was significantly lower than in the wild-type mice. Interestingly, methamphetamine-induced locomotor hyperactivity and behavioral sensitization were facilitated more in the histidine decarboxylase gene knockout mice. In the neurochemical study, noradrenaline and O-phosphoserine were decreased in the midbrain of the saline-treated histidine decarboxylase gene knockout mice. On the other hand, single administration of methamphetamine decreased GABA content of the midbrain of the wild-type mice, but did not alter that of histidine decarboxylase gene knockout mice. These results suggest that the histamine neuron system plays a role as an awakening amine in concert with the noradrenaline neuron system, whereas it has an inhibitory role on the behavioral effects of methamphetamine through the interaction with the GABAergic neuron system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)837-845
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Neurochemistry
Volume83
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002 Nov

Keywords

  • Behavioral sensitization
  • GABA
  • Histamine
  • Histidine decarboxylase
  • Methamphetamine
  • Noradrenaline

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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