Increased arteriovenous carboxyhemoglobin differences in patients with inflammatory pulmonary diseases

Hiroyasu Yasuda, Takahiko Sasaki, Mutsuo Yamaya, Satoru Ebihara, Masahiro Maruyama, Akio Kanda, Hidetada Sasaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Exhaled carbon monoxide and arterial blood carboxyhemoglobin concentrations increase in inflammatory pulmonary diseases. The present study was undertaken to elucidate whether arteriovenous carboxyhemoglobin (a-vHb-CO) concentration differences are also useful to define the site of inflammation, either in the lung or organs other than the lung. Materials and methods: We examined concentrations of carboxyhemoglobin in both arterial and peripheral venous blood and exhaled carbon monoxide in patients with acute pulmonary inflammation including bronchial asthma (n = 18) and pneumonia (n = 33), and those in patients with extrapulmonary inflammatory diseases, including acute pyelonephritis (n = 28) and active rheumatoid arthritis (n = 16). Results: The values of carboxyhemoglobin in both arterial and peripheral venous blood were significantly higher in patients with pulmonary and extrapulmonary inflammation compared with those in control subjects (n = 22). Furthermore, a-vHb-CO differences in patients with inflammatory pulmonary diseases were higher than those in patients with acute pyelonephritis and patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and than those in control subjects. The a-vHb-CO differences correlated with the WBC count of peripheral venous blood in patients with pneumonia. In patients with bronchial asthma, the a-vHb-CO differences inversely correlated with FEV1, although they did not correlate with WBC count of peripheral venous blood. The a-vHb-CO differences in patients with acute pyelonephritis were higher than those in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis. Conclusion: The present study suggests that a-vHb-CO differences may be a useful means to define the site of inflammation, either in the lung or organs other than the lung, in patients with a fever of unknown origin. The large a-vHb-CO differences may be caused by carbon monoxide production in pulmonary inflammation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2160-2168
Number of pages9
JournalChest
Volume125
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004 Jun
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Carboxyhemoglobin
  • Heme oxygenase
  • Inflammatory pulmonary disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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