Improving physical activity ensures the long-term survival of pneumonia patients in a super-aged society: A retrospective study in an acute-care hospital in Japan

Kei Sato, Shinji Okada, Ayumi Sugawara, Naoki Tode, Zenta Watanuki, Kumiko Suzuki, Masakazu Ichinose

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pneumonia is the third largest cause of death in Japan. Chest physicians have been struggling to improve the outcome of pneumonia treatment in acute care settings. However, a poor long-term prognosis after pneumonia has not been well recognized. Furthermore, the factors related to the poor prognosis, especially the possible involvement of senescence-related disability, have not been identified. In this study, long-term outcomes after discharge from hospital were retrospectively analyzed to identify factors related to the poor long-term prognosis. Outcomes of 958 pneumonia patients who were discharged from South Miyagi Medical Center (Miyagi, Japan) from June 1, 2008 to March 31, 2014 were determined through patient surveys or medical record reviews on September 26, 2014. Survival curves were constructed and compared according to various factors. Multivariate analysis revealed that all levels of decrease in physical activity, an age of 80 years old or more, the most severe status in Japanese Respiratory Society pneumonia severity grading system, the presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and comorbid malignancy significantly reduced long-term survival. The effects of dementia, neuromuscular disease, heart disease, and nursing care residency on long-term survival were detected only with univariate analysis. Physical activity influenced the acute-phase and the long-term prognosis of pneumonia. This report provides information to assist physicians in giving better suggestions to disabled older patients when choosing pneumonia treatment options. In conclusion, we propose that death related to pneumonia can be prevented in the same way as non-communicable diseases by improving physical activity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)237-245
Number of pages9
JournalTohoku Journal of Experimental Medicine
Volume238
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Mar 17

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Aspiration pneumonia
  • Community-acquired pneumonia
  • Healthcare-associated pneumonia
  • Quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

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