Implanted octacalcium phosphate (OCP) stimulates osteogenesis by osteoblastic cells and/or committed osteoprogenitors in rat calvarial periosteum

Yasuyuki Sasano, Shinji Kamakura, Hidetaka Homma, Osamu Suzuki, Itaru Mizoguchi, Manabu Kagayama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Our previous studies demonstrated that the octacalcium phosphate (OCP) causes new appositional bone formation on the OCP when implanted into the subperiosteal region of murine calvaria. The OCP may stimulate the cell population committed to the osteoblastic differentiation in the periosteum and have them express the phenotype. The present study was designed to investigate which periosteal cell population is involved in bone formation on the OCP with applying the OCP implants on top of and underneath the periosteum. The periosteum of the rat parietal bones was flapped and the OCP was implanted on top of or underneath the periosteum, in which the implantation sites were defined using the membrane filter. The histology was examined to see if new appositional bone formation occurs on the OCP implant under each condition. New bone was deposited on the OCP on the bone surface separated from the periosteum by the filter, whereas no bone was formed either under the periosteum separated from the bone surface by the filter or on the periosteum. The present study suggests that the OCP acts on osteoblasts, bone lining cells and/or their closely committed progenitors on the bone surface to express the phenotype and deposit new bone on the OCP implant.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalAnatomical Record
Volume256
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999 Sep 2

Keywords

  • Calvarium
  • Implantation
  • Octacalcium phosphate
  • Osteoblast
  • Osteogenesis
  • Periosteum
  • Rat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)

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