Impact of social relationships on income-laughter relationships among older people: The JAGES cross-sectional study

Yurika Imai, Masato Nagai, Tetsuya Ohira, Kokoro Shirai, Naoki Kondo, Katsunori Kondo

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1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives Laughter has a positive and quantifiable effect on certain aspects of health, and previous studies have suggested that income influences the emotion. However, it is unknown whether social relationship-related factors modify the association between equivalised income and laughter among older people. In the present study, we examined the relationship between equivalised income and the frequency of laughter. In addition, we examined the impact of social relationship-related factors on the association between equivalised income and frequency of laughter using a cross-sectional study design. Design Cross-sectional study and binomial regression analysis. Setting We sampled from 30 municipalities in Japan. Participants We examined 20 752 non-disabled Japanese individuals aged ≥65 years using data from the Japan Gerontological Evaluation Study. Primary outcome Frequency of laughter. Results Laughter increased significantly with an increase in equivalent income (p for trend <0.0001). Prevalence ratios (PR) for laughing almost every day were calculated according to quartile equivalised income after adjusting for age, instrumental activities of daily living, depression, frequency of meeting friends, number of social groups and family structure. The results revealed that PRs in Q4 (men; ≥ 24 420, women; ≥ 21 154) were 1.21 (95% CI 1.13 to 1.30) among men and 1.14 (95% CI 1.08 to 1.20) among women, as compared with Q1 (men; < 12 041, women; < 9518), respectively. After excluding participants with depression, the association remained significant. In addition, we found inadequate social relationships and living alone were associated with a lower frequency of laughter. In comparison with the lowest equivalent income with meeting friends less frequently and living alone, the PRs of the highest equivalent income with meeting friends frequently and living with someone were higher, respectively. Conclusions The results revealed a significant relationship between equivalent income and the frequency of laughter. Social relationships and family structure were also associated with the frequency of laughter.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere019104
JournalBMJ open
Volume8
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jul 1

Keywords

  • Japan
  • equivalised income
  • laughter
  • older people
  • social relationships

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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