Impact of safety-engineered devices on the incidence of occupational blood and body fluid exposures among healthcare personnel in an Academic Facility, 2000-2014

Hajime Kanamori, David J. Weber, Lauren M. Dibiase, Karen L. Pitman, Stephanie A. Consoli, James Hill, Emily E. Sickbert-Bennett, William A. Rutala

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

background. Legislative actions and advanced technologies, particularly dissemination of safety-engineered devices, have aided in protecting healthcare personnel from occupational blood and body fluid exposures (BBFE). objective. To investigate the trends in BBFE among healthcare personnel over 15 years and the impact of safety-engineered devices on the incidence of percutaneous injuries as well as features of injuries associated with these devices. methods. Retrospective cohort study at University of North Carolina Hospitals, a tertiary care academic facility. Data on BBFE in healthcare personnel were extracted from Occupational Health Service records (2000'2014). Exposures associated with safety-engineered and conventional devices were compared. Generalized linear models were applied to measure the annual incidence rate difference by exposure type over time. results. A total of 4,300 BBFE, including 3,318 percutaneous injuries (77%), were reported. The incidence rate for overall BBFE was significantly reduced during 2000'2014 (incidence rate difference, 1.72; P=.0003). The incidence rate for percutaneous injuries was also dramatically reduced during 2001'2006 (incidence rate difference, 1.37; P= .0079) but was less changed during 2006'2014. Percutaneous injuries associated with safety-engineered devices accounted for 27% of all BBFE. BBFE was most commonly due to injecting through skin, placing intravenous catheters, and blood drawing. conclusions. Our study revealed significant overall reduction in BBFE and percutaneous injuries likely due in part to the impact of safetyengineered devices but also identified that a considerable proportion of percutaneous injuries is now associated with these devices. Additional prevention strategies are needed to further reduce percutaneous injuries and improve design of safety-engineered devices.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)497-504
Number of pages8
JournalInfection control and hospital epidemiology
Volume37
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 May 1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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