Impact of platelet reactivity on long-term clinical outcomes and bleeding events in Japanese patients receiving antiplatelet therapy with aspirin

Keiichiro Yamane, Tomoyuki Ikeda, Ryoji Taniguchi, Shin Watanabe, Mitsunori Kawato, Hirokazu Kondo, Ryutaro Shirakawa, Tomohito Higashi, Masanao Toma, Arata Tabuchi, Toshihiro Tamura, Kanako Takahashi, Haruyo Watanabe, Yuka Yoshikawa, Toru Kita, Takeshi Kimura, Hisanori Horiuchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: Aspirin is an antiplatelet drug widely used for the prevention of cardiovascular disease; however, it is known to increase bleeding events. A low response to aspirin was reported to correlate with poor prognosis in patients undergoing antiplatelet therapy with aspirin. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the antiplatelet activity of aspirin on cardiovascular and bleeding events in Japanese patients. Methods: We analyzed the clinical course of 239 Japanese patients undergoing antiplatelet therapy with aspirin for a median of 64 months in this study. Their residual platelet reactivity was examined at enrollment and after 2 years. The co-primary endpoints were the occurrence of major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCEs) and bleeding events. Results: The annual incidence of MACCEs and major bleeding events was 3.7% and 0.48%, respectively. With defined criteria, 67 patients (28%) were classified as low responders based on the platelet aggregability measured at enrollment. Low response to aspirin was not associated with increased MACCEs, while it clearly increased MACCEs in patients less than 70 years old (low responders 36.9% vs. responders 14.8%, log rank p=0.008). Five major types of bleeding occurred in the responders, but not in low responders, although the difference was not statistically significant (p= 0.07). Conclusion: Low response to aspirin was not associated with the increase of long-term MACCEs, while it increased MACCEs in patients less than 70 years old; however, it tended to decrease major bleeding events in Japanese patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1142-1153
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of atherosclerosis and thrombosis
Volume19
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Keywords

  • Antiplatelet therapy
  • Aspirin
  • Aspirin low responder
  • Bleeding
  • Clinical outcome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Biochemistry, medical

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Impact of platelet reactivity on long-term clinical outcomes and bleeding events in Japanese patients receiving antiplatelet therapy with aspirin'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this