Impact of intention and feeling toward being pregnant on postpartum depression: the Japan Environment and Children’s Study (JECS)

Japan Environment & Children’s Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pregnancy intention is reported to be associated with the risk of postpartum depression (PPD), but the impact of feelings toward being pregnant on PPD is unknown. We aimed to examine whether feelings toward being pregnant are associated with PPD at 1 month after childbirth. In our nationwide study between 2011 and 2014 in Japan, we used multivariate logistic regression analyses to examine the associations between pregnancy intention and feelings toward being pregnant with PPD [Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS score > 9 or > 12)] among Japanese women. Among 92,431 women, 14.0 and 5.4% had PPD with EPDS scores > 9 and > 12, respectively. Compared with women who felt very happy to be pregnant, those whose pregnancy was unintended but happy, unintended and confused, those who felt troubled, and those who felt no emotion toward being pregnant had increased risks of PPD [multivariable odds ratios (95% confidence intervals (CIs)) = 1.17 (1.11–1.22), 1.39 (1.29–1.49), 1.74 (1.42–2.14), and 1.58 (1.22–2.02), respectively, for EPDS score > 9]. Those associations were more evident without antenatal possible mental illness (K6 score < 13). Women whose pregnancy was unintended should be regarded as targets for the early detection and prevention of PPD irrespective of whether they felt happy or confused.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)131-137
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Women's Mental Health
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Feb 1

Keywords

  • Emotion
  • Happiness
  • Postpartum depression
  • Unplanned pregnancy
  • Unwanted pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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