Impact of individual and neighborhood social capital on the physical and mental health of pregnant women: The Japan Environment and Children's Study (JECS)

Ryoko Morozumi, Kenta Matsumura, Kei Hamazaki, Akiko Tsuchida, Ayako Takamori, Hidekuni Inadera, Michihiro Kamijima, Shin Yamazaki, Yukihiro Ohya, Reiko Kishi, Nobuo Yaegashi, Koichi Hashimoto, Chisato Mori, Shuichi Ito, Zentaro Yamagata, Hidekuni Inadera, Takeo Nakayama, Hiroyasu Iso, Masayuki Shima, Youichi KurozawaNarufumi Suganuma, Koichi Kusuhara, Takahiko Katoh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Previous studies revealed positive, negative, and no influence of social capital on the health outcomes of pregnant women. It was considered that such differences were caused by the disparities of outcome measures and sample sizes between studies. Our chief aim was to verify the positive influence of social capital on the health condition of pregnant women using established health outcome measures and large-scale nationwide survey data. Methods: We employed questionnaire survey data from 79,210 respondents to the Japan Environment and Children's Study, and physical and mental component summary scores from the 8-Item Short-Form Health Survey as outcome measures. We estimated the effect of individual and neighborhood social capitals on physical and mental component summary scores. To consider the property that the richness of social capital would be generally determined by individual characteristics, and to estimate the causal influence of social capital on health without bias caused by said property, we adopted average treatment effect estimation with inverse probability weighting. Generally, average treatment effects are based on the difference of average outcomes between treated and untreated groups in an intervention. In this research, we reckoned individuals' different levels of social capital as a kind of non-randomized treatment for respective individuals, and we applied average treatment effect estimation. The analysis regarded pregnant women with the lowest level of social capital as untreated samples and women with other levels of social capitals as treated samples. Results: For mental component summary score, the maximum average treatment effects in the comparison between the lowest and highest levels of social capital were approximately 4.4 and 1.6 for individual and neighborhood social capital, respectively. The average treatment effects for the physical component summary score were negligible for both social capital types. Conclusions: Social capital particularly contributes to improving mental component summary score in pregnant women. The likelihood of a mentally healthy pregnancy may be increased by enhancing social capital.

Original languageEnglish
Article number450
JournalBMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Aug 6

Keywords

  • Average treatment effect
  • Inverse probability weighting
  • Japan Environment and Children's Study
  • Pregnant women
  • SF-8
  • Social capital

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Impact of individual and neighborhood social capital on the physical and mental health of pregnant women: The Japan Environment and Children's Study (JECS)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this