Impact of Elevated End-Diastolic Pulmonary Regurgitation Gradient on Worse Clinical Outcomes in Hospitalized Patients With Heart Failure

NaDEF investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The echo Doppler end-diastolic pulmonary regurgitation (EDPR) gradient correlates well with catheter-derived pulmonary artery diastolic pressure. An elevated EDPR gradient is associated with worse clinical outcomes in patients with stable coronary artery disease. However, the prognostic significance of EDPR gradient in patients with heart failure (HF) is unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prognostic impact of EDPR gradient in HF. We retrospectively examined 751 consecutive hospitalized patients with acute HF. Those with acute coronary syndrome or in-hospital death and those without accessible EDPR gradient data at discharge were excluded. Finally, 265 patients were examined and divided into 2 groups according to EDPR gradient (cutoff 9 mm Hg). Adverse events were defined as worsening HF and death. Patients with elevated EDPR gradient had higher B-type natriuretic peptide, lower age, and lower left ventricular ejection fraction at discharge than those with nonelevated EDPR gradient. During a median follow-up of 429 days, elevated EDPR gradient was independently associated with adverse events (hazard ratio 2.34, 95% CI 1.44 to 3.78, p <0.001) after adjustment for confounders. In conclusion, echo Doppler EDPR gradient might be a noninvasive predictor of clinical outcomes in hospitalized patients with HF.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)604-610
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume119
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Feb 15
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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