Impact of corticotropin-releasing hormone on gastrointestinal motility and adrenocorticotropic hormone in normal controls and patients with irritable bowel syndrome

S. Fukudo, T. Nomura, M. Hongo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

282 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background - Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) plays a key role in modulating intestinal motility in stressed animals. Aims - To evaluate the effect of CRH on intestinal motility in humans and to determine whether patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have an exaggerated response to CRH. Subjects - Ten IBS patients diagnosed by Rome criteria and 10 healthy controls. Methods - CRH (2 χ/kg) was intravenously administered during duodenal and colonic manometry and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) was measured by radioimmunoassay. Results - CRH induced motility of the descending colon in both groups (p<0.001) and induced greater motility indexes in IBS patients than in controls (p<0.05). CRH produced duodenal phase III motor activity in 80% of the subjects and duodenal dysmotility in 40% of IBS patients. Abdominal symptoms evoked by CRH in IBS patients lasted significantly longer than those in controls (p<0.05). CRH induced significant increases in plasma ACtH levels in both groups (p<0.001) and produced significantly higher plasma ACTH levels in IBS patients than in controls (p<0.001). Conclusion - Human intestinal motility is probably modulated by exogenous CRH. The brain-gut in IBS patients may have an exaggerated response to CRH.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)845-849
Number of pages5
JournalGut
Volume42
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1998

Keywords

  • Adrenocorticotropic hormone
  • Colonic motility
  • Corticotropin releasing factor
  • Duodenal motility
  • Irritable bowel syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

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