Imaging of local tunneling barrier height of InAs nanostructures using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy

Kiyoshi Kanisawa, Hiroshi Yamaguchi, Yoshiro Hirayama

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The local tunneling barrier height (LTBH) has been measured using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy to examine the local potential profile of an InAs nanostructure. The nanostructure is a faultily-stacked nanocrystal in epitaxial InAs thin film grown on GaAs(111)A substrate. It is found that averaged LTBH is consistent with the workfunction or electron affinity of InAs. The nanostructure boundary is found to have a higher LTBH than the surroundings. The resonance peak calculated using this potential wall is comparable to that measured by spectroscopy of local density of states (LDOS) in the nanostructure. A gradual LTBH decrease is additionally observed at negative sample bias voltage near the boundary indicating downward band bending, which is consistent with LDOS there.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPHYSICS OF SEMICONDUCTORS
Subtitle of host publication27th International Conference on the Physics of Semiconductors, ICPS-27
Pages825-826
Number of pages2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Jun 30
Externally publishedYes
EventPHYSICS OF SEMICONDUCTORS: 27th International Conference on the Physics of Semiconductors, ICPS-27 - Flagstaff, AZ, United States
Duration: 2004 Jul 262004 Jul 30

Publication series

NameAIP Conference Proceedings
Volume772
ISSN (Print)0094-243X
ISSN (Electronic)1551-7616

Other

OtherPHYSICS OF SEMICONDUCTORS: 27th International Conference on the Physics of Semiconductors, ICPS-27
CountryUnited States
CityFlagstaff, AZ
Period04/7/2604/7/30

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Plant Science
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

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